Glossary of Restoration Terms

 

Make sure you have a glossary of terms for your customers to view so they have a chance to really understand what you do. You would know what words need to be described best, but below are a few we found from the online RIA glossary, to help guide you and save you some time.

  • APPRAISAL: An evaluation or estimate of the value of an object or other property, including the cost to repair or loss in value incurred by damage; also an arbitration procedure required in many insurance policies as a way to resolve differences in the amount of a claim.
  • ASBESTOS: A non-combustible, inorganic fiber which was once used extensively for insulation and as binder in composite building materials. Airborne asbestos has been found to be highly injurious in relatively small quantities. Friable asbestos is powdery and capable of releasing fibers into the air. It is considered a serious hazard.
  • ADDITIONAL LIVING EXPENSE: A form of extra expense insurance, by which the insurance company provides funds to compensate for additional costs incurred when a residence cannot be used as the result of a covered loss.
  • AIR BLASTING: The use of high-pressure air often combined with an abrasive, to remove odor or adhered material from a surface.
  • AIR SCRUBBER: A device or system for removing contaminants and odors from an air stream which is a high-volume air mover connected to a HEPA or carbon filter to remove particulate materials and odors from the air.
  • ANTIMICROBIAL: A substance or condition that inhibits the growth or existence of microorganisms. Often used to describe compounds in consumer products that have the ability to limit or halt the growth of microorganisms.
  • BLISTERING: Small bubbles or bulges in a finish coat of plaster or paint, caused by entrapped moister, heat, or applying a coating over an improperly prepared surface.
  • BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS RULE: A Federal rule requiring employers to determine whether their workers have occupational exposure to body fluids, and if so, to comply with a series of safety, training and record-keeping requirements.
  • BLUSHING: A white or cloudy cast on high-gloss paint or transparent finish. Maybe caused by improper preparation, entrapped moisture, high humidity or heat.
  • BOX CORNICE: An enclosed cornice, built up of boards and moldings, often finishing the eave of a roof.
  • CARRIAGE: An inclined notched beam which supports stair treads or adds support between the stringers of a wooden staircase.
  • CLEAN (RESTORATION): To remove residues or contaminates caused by a specific incident or damage, as distinguished from preexisting or normal conditions.
  • CRAZING: Random hairline cracks forming a network pattern on or under a surface of plaster, concrete, glazed ceramic, paint or transparent finish.
  • CONTENTS MANIPULATION: Handling and positioning of furniture and other personal property required during the course of repairs.
  • DEHUMIDIFIER: A device which removes water vapor from the air. Refrigerant dehumidifiers use coils to chill air below the dew point, collecting the condensate in a receptacle: or drain; desiccant dehumidifiers collect moisture on a moisture-extracting: medium and discharge moist air to the exterior.
  • DRY OR CELLULAR SPONGE: A cellular rubber cleaning sponge which cleans by capturing and retaining small particles. These sponges have wide application in fire restoration for removing combustion residues. Dry, or Cellular sponges have no active chemical properties and deposit no residue of their own.
  • DRY SMOKE: Fire residues characterized by loose, non-smeary particles which tend to remain on the surface. Dry smoke reflects a freely burning fire with cellulosic materials as a primary fuel.
  • ETCHING: A uniform pitting on the surface of glass, metal or stone caused by chemical reaction with an acid; a form of graphic art work in which the image is created by the transfer of ink lodged in recesses scribed into the surface of a metal plate.
  • EXPOSURE LIMITS: The concentration of toxic substances to which workers may be safely exposed, as established by the ACGIH and enforced by OHSA.
  • EXTRACTION: A restoration process in which a liquid cleaning agent or solvent is sprayed on a surface and immediately vacuumed out, removing dissolved soils or residues.
  • FRT PLYWOOD: Abbr. for Fire Resistant Treated plywood, a construction material used as roof sheathing and subject to premature deterioration because of its hygroscopic qualities.
  • FASCIA: A flat board, band, or facing strip used by itself or in combination with moldings, generally at the outer face of a cornice or eave; sometimes called a gutter board.
  • FILTRATION SOIL: A normal condition which appears as dark streaks on carpeting or insulation in the path of continuing air flow. The affected materials filter out airborne particles which accumulate over time.
  • FINGER JOINTING: A type of joinery, permitting smaller segments of millwork to be combined into a single length, sometimes specified as paint grade.
  • FOGGING: A process in which liquid materials are broadcasted as a mist of finely divided particles.
  • GLULAM JOIST: A framing material formed by layers of wood bound together by resins into a structural unit, used as an alternative to solid lumber.
  • GRIT BLASTING: The application of abrasive substances driven by compressed air or water, in order to remove rust, adhered materials or coatings. A wide variety of materials may be used, corresponding to the hardness of the surface, the nature of the adhered material and other job requirements.
  • GROUT: Mortar used for filling joints in unit masonry or ceramic tile; also a mixture of cement and water, or similar materials, used to consolidate unstable earth.
  • HEADER: A framing member which crosses and supports the ends of joists, rafters or studs, transferring their weight to adjacent parallel members, usually to bridge an opening. A masonry unit laid over two or more adjacent withes of masonry and tying them together. In plumbing it’s a main pipe or manifold from which outlets extend.
  • HEIGHTENED AWARENESS: A tendency, after a fire or other traumatic incident, to view one’s surroundings with greater scrutiny, often mistaking long-standing conditions for new damage.
  • HOSTILE FIRE: Destructive combustion which occurs or spreads outside normal areas of containment.
  • HOT WATER EXTRACTION: A cleaning process in which a heated detergent solution is sprayed and simultaneously vacuumed from a surface, carrying off dissolved soils and residues.
  • INDEPENDENT AGENT: An agent or agency which has no exclusive company relationship, representing several or many insurers and placing business at its own discretion.
  • INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR: A self-employed worker who, while retaining control over essential elements of work behavior, performs work pursuant to a contractual agreement with an employer.
  • INDOOR AIR QUALITY, IAQ: The condition of the ambient air within a building, as measured by the presence or absence of fresh or stale air and airborne contaminants.
  • INVESTIGATIVE DEMOLITION: The opening of cavities or removal of building components required in order to perform an inspection.
  • JACK RAFTER: A rafter that is shorter than the usual length of the rafters used for the roof, for example the shorter rafters which are used towards the end of a hip roof or: dormer.
  • JOIST HANGER: A fabricated metal bracket or strap used to attach and support the end of a joist to a header, beam or girder.
  • KILN DRIED: Dried or seasoned in an enclosure in which excess moisture has been drive off by heating, in contrast to air drying; used to bring lumber to some pre-determined moisture content prior to milling or other use.
  • LATENT DAMAGE: Damage not yet apparent but which may occur at a subsequent time.
  • LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENTS: Building improvements performed by a tenant. Leasehold improvements usually revert to the building owner, as defined in the lease, which also determines whose insurance responds in the event of a loss.
  • LIGHT REFINISH: A restoration process, usually involving cleaning, surface preparation and application of a spray coating, in contrast to full, or complete refinishing, which involves the removal of existing finishes and building a new finish.
  • MARKUP: An amount added to the cost price to cover overhead and profit, usually expressed as a percentage.
  • MASKING: A protection for surfaces adjacent paintwork, often involving removable tape or paper, installed to keep the protected surfaces free of paint; applying a pleasing scent with the intention of covering an objectionable odor.
  • MILDEW: A mold or fungus that grows and feeds on organic materials exposed to heat, moisture and stagnant air.
  • MUD-SET: A means of affixing tile or masonry units by embedding them in mortar, rather than using an adhesive.
  • NATURAL FIBER: A fiber derived from plants or animals.
  • NEGATIVE PRESSURE: A condition of lower air pressure than the surrounding areas, causing air to flow towards the area of negative pressure; usually induced to limit the spread of dust or contaminants.
  • NON-BEARING WALL: A wall supporting no load other than its own weight; a partition.
  • OPEN ITEM: An item listed in an estimate or work order for which the restoration procedure or cost cannot be determined without further testing, investigation or actual performance.
  • ORANGE PEEL: In spray painting, a defect in which the coating has the texture of an orange peel. The varied causes include holding the gun too close to the surface or using a thinner which dries too quickly.
  • OXIDIZE: A common chemical reaction in which a substance combines or reacts with oxygen to form a different substance.
  • PEELING: A loss of adhesion in a paint film, plaster or other membrane which cause it to separate from the substrate in flakes or strips.
  • PLASTIC FIRE: A fire involving polymers as a primary fuel, resulting in highly acid fire residues.
  • PLENUM: A main air duct serving one or more distribution ducts; the space between a suspended ceiling and the structure above it.
  • PLYSCORD: A rough sheathing board for roofs or walls, designed for utility rather than appearance.
  • POWDER CLEAN: To remove unwanted residues by applying and agitating an absorbent powder. The powder dislodges and holds the residues, which are removed along with it.
  • PRESSURIZED SMOKE: Combustion products propelled by high heat, temperature differential, or vapor pressure in which causes them to penetrate normally enclosed spaces.
  • PROTEIN FIRE: The slow combustion or carbonization of meat, fish or fowl, which generates a highly obnoxious and persistent odor, carried by a clear and often invisible residue.
  • PUBLIC ADJUSTER: An individual who represents policy-holders in preparing and presenting their claims to insurance companies, often taking a percentage of the loss as compensation.
  • QUARTER SAWED: Lumber sawed perpendicular to the annual rings, presenting the parallel edge grain across the face of the board; the proportion of quarter sawed to plain sawed lumber determines the grade of hardwood flooring.
  • RESIDUE: Materials carried by air, smoke, water, or other substances which remain after the transporting medium has been removed or dissipated.
  • RESTORATIVE CLEANING: The application of procedures designed to remove damaging residues from a particular surface while retaining as much of the original character as possible, often requiring the use of specialized or unorthodox techniques and equipment.
  • ROUGH IN: The initial piping and electrical wiring which are installed within walls and cavities, in contrast to exposed fixtures and fittings; to install such materials.
  • SANITIZE, SANITIZER: The act or process of reducing microorganisms to safe levels as judged by public health agencies; a substance that limits or controls microorganisms when used according to manufacturer’s instructions
  • SATURATION: A condition under which no further moisture or other liquid can be retained e.g. saturated air has a relative humidity of 100%; also the degree of purity of a: color. A color is said to be saturated when it contains no white.
  • SECONDARY DAMAGE: Damage which arises out of primary damage, such as airborne moisture, mildew, corrosion or fire odors.
  • SHADING: A gradual color change across a surface; in plush carpeting and velvet fabrics, a non-uniform appearance caused by the varying reflectance of irregular pile lay.
  • SHRINKAGE: The reduction in dimensions of wood resulting from a decrease in moisture content; the decrease in concrete volume caused by drying and chemical changes; the diminished size of some textiles caused by wetting.
  • SMOKE STAIN: A discoloration caused by the penetration of fire residues into a material or surface.
  • STAIN RETARDENT: An application for textiles which imparts some degree of protection against staining.
  • TEMPORARY REPAIRS, TEMPS: Emergency work performed immediately after a damage incident in order to secure and protect the property and mitigate the damage.
  • THERMAL CONTRACTION EXPANSION: Dimensional changes in materials induced by fluctuations in temperature.
  • TRAP: A plumbing device to maintain a water seal against sewer gases, air, and odors.
  • ULTRA LOW VOLUME (ULV) FOGGER: A device for dispersing aqueous liquids in extremely fine droplets so as to produce an almost dry mist.
  • UNDERLAYMENT: A material such as plywood or hardboard placed over a subfloor to provide a smooth, even surface for applying the finish floor; also the material used to cover a roof deck before shingles are applied.
  • VACUUM FREEZE DRYING: A method of drying large quantities of wet books and documents, in which frozen water is converted to vapor without passing through a liquid phase.
  • VAPOR BARRIER: A membrane used to prevent moisture from penetrating a wall, roof or floor;: also a wrap to prevent the escape of condensed water from cold pipes or ducts.
  • VISQUEEN: Trade name for sheet polyethylene, used as a vapor barrier or protective covering.
  • WAIVER: An instrument or action which intentionally relinquishes a right, claim, or privilege.
  • WATER MIGRATION: The movement of water within a material by capillary action; the spread of water as liquid or vapor to areas not initially impacted.
  • WET SMOKE: Airborne combustion products containing a high liquid component in the form of aerosols, usually generated by smoldering, oxygen-starved fires; fire residues which are tacky, penetrating and extremely malodorous.
  • WITHE, WYTHE: A brick partition separating two flues in a single chimney; a masonry wall with a thickness of one brick.
  • YELLOWING: The development of a yellow cast in white, light colored or clear surfaces from aging, sun fading, oxidation, heat or fire residues; may also be caused by improper cleaning procedures, such as the use of strongly alkaline detergents on white wool; the condition may be illusory when based on background colors.